Saturday, 19 August 2017

August 19 2017

 
 
 NATURE MONCTON’S INFORMATION LINE – 19 August 2017 (Saturday)
 

To respond by email, please address your message to the Information Line Editor, nelson@nb.sympatico.ca.

Please advise the Editor if any errors are noted in wording or photo labelling.

For more information on Nature Moncton, check the website at www.naturemoncton.com

Edited by: Nelson Poirier nelson@nb.sympatico.ca
Transcript by: Catherine Clements
Info Line #: 506-384-6397 (384-NEWS)


**Lois Budd got a great photo of an EASTERN KINGBIRD [Tyran tritri] on Friday evening, as it rested from hawking insects. The gleaming white chest and white tail tip show nicely.

**Hilary Reeves has a pond on the Scotch Settlement Road that hosts GREEN FROGS [Grenouille verte], BULLFROGS [Ouaouaron], and LEOPARD FROGS [Grenouille léopard] at the moment. She has noted that three of the Green Frogs noted have varied amounts of distinct blue pigment. We’ve had photos of blue Frogs from Nova Scotia and Ontario, but seemingly few from New Brunswick. Amphibian-reptile guru John Gilhen from the Nova Scotia Museum of Natural History comments that blue Frogs are popping up in lots of places in Nova Scotia. Steve Hecnar in Ontario is compiling all reports of blue Green Frogs in Canada. Hilary’s observations will be forwarded to Steve Hecnar, as John suspects that he has had few reports from New Brunswick, and we’ll hopefully get some comments back as to the meaning of these blue Frog observations.

**Brian Stone and Pat Ford visited the Riverview Marsh on Friday. They found a heavy concentration of shorebirds there. Lots of both YELLOWLEGS [Chevalier] and SEMIPALMATED [Bécasseau semipalmé] and LEAST SANDPIPERS [Bécasseau minuscule] were predominant. This is becoming a very popular shorebird site, with the change to the impoundment and dry area this year. They also noted a healthy stand of COMMON MILKWEED [Herbe à coton], but noted no activity around it while they were there. Brian also photographed a Common Wood-nymph butterfly, a Slender Meadow Katydid, and the day flying moth Virginia Ctenucha

**I was in the Neguac area on Friday to take in some of the bird activity there. A juvenile BLACK-CROWNED NIGHT-HERON [Bihoreau gris] was in the area of the main Neguac wharf, moving about and foraging. Interesting to see BONAPARTE'S GULLS [Mouette de Bonaparte] and GREATER YELLOWLEGS [Grand Chevalier] side by side. Several shorebirds were at Hay Island, to include both YELLOWLEGS [Chevalier], a SEMIPALMATED PLOVER [Pluvier semipalmé] juvenile (noting the dark bill and scaling of the feathers), and LEAST SANDPIPERS [Bécasseau minuscule].
One of the Greater Yellowlegs appeared so different from its surrounding kin due to its much lighter plumage and erratic behaviour. A photo is attached showing it with its dark kin. I am assuming this may be a young-of-the-year bird to really show the plumage variability with age.

nelson@nb.sympatico.ca
Nelson Poirier
Nature Moncton


BLACK-CROWNED NIGHT HERON (JUVENILE).AUG 18, 2017.NELSON POIRIER

BLACK-CROWNED NIGHT HERON (JUVENILE).AUG 18, 2017.NELSON POIRIER

BONAPARTE'S GULL (JUVENILE).AUG 18, 2017.NELSON POIRIER

COMMON WOOD-NYMPH BUTTERFLY.  AUG. 18, 2017. BRIAN STONE

EASTERN KINGBIRD.AUG 18, 2017.LOIS BUDD.

EASTERN KINGBIRD.AUG 18, 2017.LOIS BUDD.

GREATER YELLOWLEGS AND BONAPARTE'S GULL.AUG 18, 2017.NELSON POIRIER

GREATER YELLOWLEGS.AUG 18, 2017.NELSON POIRIER 

GREATER YELLOWLEGS.AUG 18, 2017.NELSON POIRIER 

GREEN FROG (BLUE PIGMENT).AUG 15, 2017.HILARY REEVES 

GREEN FROG (BLUE PIGMENT).AUG 15, 2017.HILARY REEVES 

GREEN FROG (BLUE PIGMENT).AUG 15, 2017.HILARY REEVES 

LESSER YELLOWLEGS .AUG 18, 2017.NELSON POIRIER

LESSER YELLOWLEGS. AUG. 18, 2017. BRIAN STONE

SLENDER MEADOW KATYDID. AUG. 18, 2017. BRIAN STONE

SEMIPALMATED PLOVER (JUVENILE).AUG 18, 2017 .NELSON POIRIER

SEMIPALMATED PLOVER (JUVENILE).AUG 18, 2017 .NELSON POIRIER

VIRGINIA CTENUTCHA MOTH. AUG. 18, 2017. BRIAN STONE

YELLOWLEGS. AUG. 18, 2017. BRIAN STONE

Friday, 18 August 2017

August 18, 2017

 
NATURE MONCTON INFORMATION LINE, August 18, 2017 ( Friday )
 
To respond by e-mail, please address your message to the information line editor, 
nelson@nb.sympatico.ca . Please advise if any errors are noted in wording or photo labeling.

 For more information on Nature Moncton, check the website at
www.naturemoncton.com .

 
Edited by: Nelson Poirier nelson@nb.sympatico.ca
Transcript by: Brian Stone bjpstone@gmail.com
Info Line # 506-384-6397 (384-NEWS)

 
** A group from Barachois and Cap Brule met on Thursday evening in Barachois to discuss what may be done to help the diminishing Swallow numbers in the Cap Brule area. I am very sorry that the message about this arrived too late to be added to Thursday's message but was very pleased to hear that a group is seeking a way to help remedy the situation with the Swallow numbers.
 
** Ray Gauvin got some nice photos of a PAINTED LADY [Belle dame] butterfly on Thursday on the walking trail near his home at Parlee Beach. This would probably be a second generation of this species that migrate into New Brunswick from the south in the spring. Ray also got some nice photos of two different species of BUMBLEBEES, with one photo showing two species side by side. We have several Bumblebee species in New Brunswick and the Tri-colored may be the more common.
The photos have been labelled to species with the help of BuGguide. 

** Joanne Savage shares some photos from one of two PAINTED LADY [Belle dame] butterflies she raised from caterpillars to the chrysalis stage to adult. It would appear that the American Lady and Painted Lady caterpillars are not particularly easy to separate without sharp photos. The food plant being used is helpful in separating the two species as well. Am going to quote Joanne as to the dates of changes
 
Quoting Joanne “I found them on my Heliotrope [annual type]. Seems like it's a host plant of
Painted Lady.
The plant was well covered in curled up leaves so after I remove those 2
caterpillars for id, I 'Raided' the plant.
at the time I felt guilty but later realized the plant would not have
sustained the number on it.

I noticed the caterpillars on July 24th, they would only accept Heliotrope as a food
leaf. In fact, ate 5 -6 six large leaves daily.
One entered chrysalis stage Aug. 4th, the 2nd on Aug. 5th.. One emerged from
chrysalis on Aug. 14th and the 2nd on Aug. 15th.”
 
**Georges Brun visited Johnson’s Mills on Thursday. The tide was low when he visited but he did get to see some Black-bellied Plovers, Semipalmated Plovers, and Semipalmated Sandpipers feeding. He also got a photo recently of a Peregrine Falcon on Chateau Moncton as well as a female Belted Kingfisher at Bis March.

 
** Leigh Eaton comments that he seems to be having a real surge of summer activity in his Moncton birdfeeder yard to include the AMERICAN GOLDFINCH [Chardonneret jaune] feasting on niger seed, WOODPECKERS that are enjoying peanut butter, one orange variant HOUSE FINCH [Roselin familier], DARK-EYED JUNCOS [Junco ardoisé], CHIPPING SPARROWS [Bruant familier], BLUE JAYS [Geai bleu], AMERICAN ROBINS [Merle d'Amérique], MOURNING DOVES [Tourterelle triste] and COMMON GRACKLES [Quiscale bronzé]. Leigh sends a few photos of the activity.

** I keep black boot mats for snakes to get under at our Little Southwest Miramichi River camp. Red-bellied Snakes use them in significant numbers and an occasional Garter Snake and Smooth Green Snake. However, I have never seen these species together as in the example photograph from Thursday, with a RED-BELLIED SNAKE and larger GARTER SNAKE coiled up together under one of the mats. Another photo shows the shed skin of a Red-bellied Snake which is a popular item that some bird species like to include in their nest construction. Unfortunately the photo of the two snakes is not showing colours completely accurately.

This weeks Sky-at-a-Glance is added to this edition courtesy of Kurt Nason with lots of information on Monday afternoon's partial eclipse of the sun.
 
This Week’s Sky at a Glance, August 19 – August 26
There is no doubt about the astronomical highlight for New Brunswick
this week – a partial solar eclipse on Monday afternoon. Times will vary
a little across the province but 2:30 to 5:00 pm will cover it. At the
peak, between 3:45 and 3:50, approximately 50% of the Sun’s surface area
will be covered by the Moon. This is our best solar eclipse since August
11, 1999, when more than 90% of the Sun was covered, and slightly better
than the Christmas 2000 partial eclipse.

Solar eclipses occur at new Moon, but since the lunar orbit is tilted to
Earth’s orbit by five degrees (ten times the Moon’s apparent diameter)
it is usually above or below the Sun at that phase. For a period of a
few weeks, twice a year, new Moon occurs when it is near to crossing
Earth’s orbit and there will be a partial, annular or total eclipse
somewhere on the planet. With a total eclipse, a rarity at any one
location, the Moon’s shadow races across part of Earth on a path 100 to
200 kilometres wide. Locations outside of the shadow get a partial
eclipse, with percent coverage decreasing with distance. An annular
eclipse occurs when the Moon is near apogee and its apparent width is
smaller than that of the Sun.

Staring at the Sun without proper eye protection can cause permanent eye
damage, even blindness, and since the eye has no pain receptors you may
not notice any damage for several hours. Proper protection is #14
welder’s glass or approved eclipse viewers / glasses from a reputable
dealer. Note that these are not safe for use with binoculars and
telescopes; other filters can be purchased for this purpose. A cheap and
effective way to view the partial eclipse is to project the sunlight
through a pinhole onto a white surface. Check the Internet for methods
of doing this. Or, use Nature’s projection method by looking at the
shadows of leaves, which often have tiny holes to project the Sun’s image.

The RASC and other organizations are hosting eclipse events in the
province on Monday afternoon, with free eclipse viewers supplied by the
RASC and views through filtered telescopes. Locations include the Irving
Nature Park and Rockwood Park Bark Park in Saint John, UNB and Science
East in Fredericton, Resurgo Place in Moncton, Riverview Community
Centre, and Mount Allison University. Don’t take chances with your
eyesight. Observe the eclipse but do it safely, and start thinking about
where you will be on April 8, 2024 when the Moon’s shadow crosses the
central half of New Brunswick.

This Week in the Solar System

Saturday’s sunrise in Moncton is at 6:23 am and sunset will occur at
8:20 pm, giving 13 hours, 57 minutes of daylight (6:30 am and 8:24 pm in
Saint John). Next Saturday the Sun will rise at 6:31 am and set at 8:08
pm, giving 13 hours, 37 minutes of daylight (6:38 am and 8:12 pm in
Saint John).

The Moon is new on Monday afternoon, partially occulting a prominent
star for a couple of hours, and it poses with Jupiter in evening
twilight next Thursday and Friday. Jupiter sets by 10:00 pm next weekend
and it is approaching Spica nightly. Saturn, in the southern sky in
evening twilight, is the main telescopic attraction for the month.
Venus, the bright Morning Star, moves from Gemini into Cancer late in
the week. Mercury is at inferior conjunction on August 26, passing
between us and the Sun.

Questions? Contact Curt Nason at
nasonc@nbnet.nb.ca.
 
Nelson Poirier,
Nature Moncton

TWO SEMIPALMATED SANDPIPERS AND SEMIPALMATED PLOVER AUG 17 2017 GEORGES BRUN

AMERICAN GOLDFINCH.AUG 16, 2017.LEIGH EATON

BELTED KINGFISHER (F) AUG 15 2017 GEORGES BRUN

BLACK-BELLIED PLOVER AUG 17 2017 GEORGES BRUN 

DOWNY WOODPECKER.AUG 16, 2017.LEIGH EATON

GARTER SNAKE AND REDBELLY SNAKE. AUG 17, 2017. NELSON POIRIER

NORTHERN AMBER BUMBLEBEE ( Bombus borealis) ON LEFT .HALF-BLACK BUMBLEBEE (Bombus vagans) ONRIGHT.AUG 16, 2017.RAY GAUVIN

Mid-eclipse

HOUSE FINCH (ORANGE VARIANT).AUG 16, 2017.LEIGH EATON

HELIOTROPE PLANT USED BY PAINTED LADY CATERPILLARS.AUG , 2017.JOANNE SAVAGE

HALF-BLACK BUMBLEBEE (Bombus vagans).AUG 16, 2017.RAY GAUVIN

NORWAY RAT.AUG 16, 2017.LEIGH EATON

PAINTED LADY BUTTERFLY CATERPILLAR .JULY 24, 2017.JOANNE SAVAGE

PAINTED LADY BUTTERFLY.AUG 15, 2017.JOANNE SAVAGE

PAINTED LADY BUTTERFLY.AUG 16, 2017.RAY GAUVIN 

PAINTED LADY BUTTERFLY.AUG 16, 2017.RAY GAUVIN 

PEREGRINE FALCON AUG 14 2017 GEORGES BRUN

REDBELLY SNAKE (SHED SKIN).AUG 17, 2017.NELSON POIRIER
NORTHERN AMBER BUMBLEBEE ( Bombus borealis) ON LEFT .HALF-BLACK BUMBLEBEE (Bombus vagans) ON RIGHT.AUG 16, 2017.RAY GAUVIN

Thursday, 17 August 2017

August 17 2017

 
 
NATURE MONCTON INFORMATION LINE, August 17, 2017 ( Thursday )
 

 To respond by e-mail, please address your message to the information line editor, 
nelson@nb.sympatico.ca . Please advise if any errors are noted in wording or photo labeling.

 For more information on Nature Moncton, check the website at
www.naturemoncton.com .

 
Edited by: Nelson Poirier nelson@nb.sympatico.ca
Transcript by: Brian Stone bjpstone@gmail.com
Info Line # 506-384-6397 (384-NEWS)

 
** It's that time of year to see COMMON NIGHTHAWKS [Engoulevent d'Amérique] in groups as they chart their migration routes south and is extra pleasant to hear of them in good numbers. Rose-Alma Mallet watched approximately forty Common Nighthawks hawking insects for about half an hour over her home and the Cap Brule lagoon area on Tuesday evening.

** Lois Budd shares photos of the later blooming plant TURTLEHEAD which is in full bloom at the moment and is being very attractive to the bees for their pollen and nectar gathering missions. A SAVANNAH SPARROW [Bruant des prés] dropped by to watch the goings on. Lois is not noting any butterflies to the Turtlehead but the Turtlehead is the host plant of the Baltimore Checkerspot butterfly.

** It is very much caterpillar and chrysalis time and some very interesting observations can be made of the numerous butterflies and moths that are in that process at the moment. Kate Holmes found just that when removing seed heads from her Saint John garden Artemisia plants. Kate got a nice photo of a caterpillar and what appears to be a chrysalis. She noted several of both so the change from larval caterpillar stage to the pupal chrysalis stage must be occurring at the moment for this species. The photos Kate has shared are suspected to be the caterpillar and chrysalis of the Painted Lady butterfly or  the American Lady butterfly. It is rather suspected to be the latter as Artemesia is considered one of its potential food plants.
 
** Jamie Burris comments that he had been reading about insects getting caught in Milkweed and he observed a HONEY BEE that was stuck for approximately five minutes in his Riverview yard Milkweed patch. Jamie also photographed what appears to be a pair of CAROLINA GRASSHOPPERS that may be mating. The Carolina Grasshopper and the Crackling Grasshopper are more easily identified when they open their wings in flight. A Paper Wasp (Polistes) wasp species was flying above his yard which proved to be much more challenging to photograph than the bees. It has been a while since we have been seeing HUMMINGBIRD CLEARWING MOTHS. Jamie had one visiting Phlox blooms on August 05.

** Brian Stone shares some photos he got around his home on Tuesday, to include a TARNISHED PLANT BUG nymph and a WHITE-FACED MEADOWHAWK dragonfly. Brian also started some practice shots for the partial solar eclipse due next Monday afternoon and was able to photograph the new sunspot, AR2671, that is just coming coming around and will be heading across the sun's disk over the next few days. Brian advises to use proper solar viewing techniques and equipment when viewing and photographing the sun or the partial eclipse on Monday. Always be careful of the sun as it can quickly damage your eyes if viewed under the wrong conditions.
 
 
Nelson Poirier,
Nature Moncton




 
AMERICAN LADY BUTTERFLY CATERPILLAR (SUSPECTED),AUG 14, 2017.KATE HOLMES

AMERICAN LADY BUTTERFLY CHRYSALIS (SUSPECTED),AUG 14, 2017.KATE HOLMES .

AMERICAN LADY BUTTERFLY CHRYSALIS (SUSPECTED),AUG 14, 2017.KATE HOLMES .

CAROLINA GRASSHOPPERS AUG 14 2017 JAMIE BURRIS

HONEY BEE AUG 6 2017 JAMIE BURRIS

HONEYBEE TRAPPED ON SWAMP MILKWEED AUG 4 2017 JAMIE BURRIS


HUMMINGBIRD CLEAR WING MOTH AUG 5 2017 JAMIE BURRIS 

PAPER WASP (Polistes dominula) JULY 26 2017 JAMIE BURRIS 

PAPER WASP (Polistes dominula) JULY 26 2017 JAMIE BURRIS 

SAVANNAH SPARROW.AUG 16, 2017.LOIS BUDD

SUNSPOT AR2671. AUG. 16, 2017.  BRIAN STONE

SUNSPOT AR2671. AUG. 16, 2017.  BRIAN STONE

TARNISHED PLANT BUG NYMPH. AUG. 15, 2017. BRIAN STONE

TURTLEHEAD IN BLOOM.AUG 16, 2017.LOIS BUDD

WHITE-FACED MEADOWHAWK DRAGONFLY. AUG. 15, 2017. BRIAN STONE