Monday, 23 October 2017

Oct 23 2017

 
 
 
 
NATURE MONCTON INFORMATION LINE, Oct. 23, 2017 (Monday)
 

 
To respond by e-mail, please address your message to the information line editor nelson@nb.sympatico.ca
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For more information on Nature Moncton, check the website at www.naturemoncton.com
 
 
 
Edited by: Nelson Poirier nelson@nb.sympatico.ca
Transcript by: David Christie maryspt@mac.com
Info Line # 506-384-6397 (384-NEWS)
 
 
**    The HOUSE SPARROW [Moineau domestique] was at one time very common in New Brunswick, but not anymore, and maybe the EASTERN BLUEBIRDS [Merlebleu de l'Est] and TREE SWALLOWS [Hirondelle bicolore] are clapping their wings. Jules Cormier had a male House Sparrow show up in his Memramcook yard on Sunday and he thinks that it may be the first time that he has had one in his yard in 40 years. Jules also had a WHITE-BREASTED NUTHATCH [Sittelle à poitrine blanche] come by on Sunday.
 
**   Ray Gauvin checked the Shepody area and the old mill road for the CRESTED CARACARA [Caracara du Nord] on Sunday but it did not appear. I dropped by that area in the morning and late in the afternoon and did not see it either. Ray did get a photo of an AUTUMN MEADOWHAWK [Sympetrum tardif] there. It seemed timid of him but kept returning to the same spot, appearing to want to get its photo taken. Its yellow basal wing patches are quite typical of this species and some other meadowhawks. Note the brown legs specific to Autumn Meadowhawk.
 
**   Aldo Dorio came across two GRAY JAYS [Mésangeai du Canada] on Sunday. Two of the views give some detail of undertail pattern. I’m not used to noting if this is a normal pattern of an adult. It does seem to vary.
 
**  There’s more material to show from the falconry trip on Saturday. Brian Stone took two videos of Jamie Stride showing his SAKER FALCON [Faucon sacre]. Note that one shows the bird’s head staying in the same position, even though Jamie's hand is moving like a swaying branch, so that the falcon’s eyes can stay focused on the same spot. Be sure to turn up the volume to be able to hear Jamie’s comments.


**  I recently drove by the pond in Lower Coverdale, where the two domestic BLACK-NECKED SWANS [Cygne à cou noir] have four cygnets. Two groups of CANADA GEESE [Bernache du Canada] were trying to enter the pond from different areas, but the swans were having nothing of it and were busy advising them in no uncertain terms that they were not welcome and to leave the area.
 
I’ve been noting the very abundant BAYBERRIES [myrique] forming in coastal areas. These berries have a large seed covered with a lipid which has been used in making scented candles but also gets some usage by overwintering YELLOW-RUMPED WARBLERS [Paruline à croupion jaune] that use the rich lipid as a food source, hence their older name of Myrtle Warbler, from the older name of the plant.
 
 
Nelson Poirier,
Nature Moncton
 
AUTUMN MEADOWHAWK.OCT 22,2017.RAY GAUVIN 


BAYBERRIES.OCT 21, 2017.NELSON POIRIER 

BAYBERRIES.OCT 21, 2017.NELSON POIRIER 

GRAY JAY  OCT 22, 2017.ALDO DORIO 

GRAY JAY  OCT 22, 2017.ALDO DORIO 

GRAY JAY  OCT 22, 2017.ALDO DORIO

AUTUMN MEADOWHAWK.OCT 22,2017 .RAY GAUVIN

Sunday, 22 October 2017

Oct 22 2017

NATURE MONCTON INFORMATION LINE, Oct. 22, 2017 (Sunday)

To respond by e-mail, please address your message to the information line editor nelson@nb.sympatico.ca
   Please advise if any errors are noted in wording or photo labeling.
For more information on Nature Moncton, check the website at www.naturemoncton.com
Edited by: Nelson Poirier nelson@nb.sympatico.ca
Transcript by: David Christie maryspt@mac.com
Info Line # 506-384-6397 (384-NEWS)
**    Despite the dry summer, there are still some mushrooms fruiting. Kevin Renton reports he found a good-sized fruiting of OYSTER MUSHROOMS [Pleurote en forme d'huitre] on Saturday morning that are heading for haute cuisine.
**   Possibly the best field trip ever to have happened for Nature Moncton took place on the beautiful fall day of Saturday when 28 folks headed over to ISLAND FALCONRY SERVICES on P.E.I., located approximately 10 km from the Confederation Bridge, for a stunning display of falconry at its finest, with very skilled and knowledgeable owner-operator Jamie Stride. Jamie gave an hour's presentation on falconry, to explain what is involved in ownership of a falconry, and the uses he puts his falcons to, their behaviour and the relationships they have with their owners. He then took a few of his falcons and hawks outdoors to let everyone present have a Harris’s Hawk [Buse de Harris] fly onto their leather-covered arms for food. This turned out to be an experience that will never be forgotten. I suspect that the photos taken were well over a thousand of these beautiful creatures at work; many are attached today, including a video link of Annette Stone having her turn at https://www.dropbox.com/s/9ue4hqd15rvp6ia/Annette%20and%20Harris%27s%20Hawk.MOV?dl=0
.
Mitch Doucet shares an awesome set of photos he shares from his Flickr page that can be viewed at https://flic.kr/s/aHsm6AgZkN

   Brian Stone is going to make up a photo series that folks will be able to see at a drop-box link, where he’ll show most people having their turn, as well as sundry other photos of this awesome event. Brian should have that available over the next few days and the link will be placed on the Blogspot, so individuals will be able to go to it to view and keep pictures for memories. 
This event got little pre-advertisement, as the number of people that could be accommodated was filled as fast as it was announced. This is an event that will be repeated again. Groups can make an arrangement to get an appointment with Jamie Stride, Island Falconry Services, at telephone number 902-954-0357, or e-mail falconrypei@gmail.com. A pre-arranged visit is very enlightening and highly recommended. Falconry is permitted and licensed in all provinces of Canada, except New Brunswick and Newfoundland. 
All thanks to Nature Moncton president Susan Atkinson for being the lead person making arrangements for this appreciated event.
Nelson Poirier,
Nature Moncton
 
GYRFALCON X PEREGRINE Oct 21st 2017 CARMELLA MELANSON


GYRFALCON X PEREGRINE Oct 21st 2017 CARMELLA MELANSON

HARRIS'S HAWK (catching food morsel in flight) Oct 21st 2017 CARMELLA MELANSON

HARRIS'S HAWK. LOUISE NICHOLS. OCT. 21, 2017

HARRIS'S HAWK. OCT. 21, 2017. BRIAN STONE

JAMIE STRIDE AND SAKER FALCON. OCT. 21, 2017. BRIAN STONE

NELSON WITH HARRIS'S HAWK. LOUISE NICHOLS. OCT. 21, 2017

PEREGRINE GYRFALCON HYBRID. LOUISE NICHOLS. OCT. 21, 2017

PEREGRINExGYRFALCON. OCT. 21, 2017. BRIAN STONE

SAKER FALCON. LOUISE NICHOLS. OCT. 21, 2017

Saturday, 21 October 2017

Oct 21 2017

 NATURE MONCTON’S INFORMATION LINE – 21 October 2017 (Saturday)


To respond by email, please address your message to the Information Line Editor, nelson@nb.sympatico.ca

Please advise the Editor if any errors are noted in wording or photo labelling.

For more information on Nature Moncton, check the website at www.naturemoncton.com

Edited by: Nelson Poirier nelson@nb.sympatico.ca
Transcript by: Catherine Clements
Info Line #: 506-384-6397 (384-NEWS)


**Danny and Nicole Sullivan and Brian and Annette Stone made a run into Albert County on Friday to include Fundy National Park. Before they left Moncton, Brian got some documentary photos of GADWALL [Canard chipeau], HOODED MERGANSER [Harle couronné], and WOOD DUCK [Canard branchu] in the pond behind the St. George Street fire station, obviously a close-by pond that we’re not checking enough. The Hooded Merganser and Wood Duck male were back in breeding (alternate) plumage. At Fundy National Park they very much enjoyed the BEAVER [Castor] colony in Maclaren Pond near headquarters, that are active during the day, to make it a real treat for visitors to the park to watch their activities very closely. Brian took some close-up photos of the action, as well as a video of one Beaver in the process of hauling a seemingly large ASPEN [Tremble] log into position. Check it out at https://www.dropbox.com/s/xbambqlquqjh41f/DSCN7661.MOV?dl=0 Brian also got a photo of a LAKE DARNER Dragonfly [Aeschne porte-crosses] and an ICHNEUMON WASP [Guêpe ichneumon], of which we have several species in New Brunswick. They are harmless to humans. They stopped by the old mill road in the Shepody area and checked the area both going and coming, but did not locate the CRESTED CARACARA [Caracara du Nord].

nelson@nb.sympatico.ca
Nelson Poirier
Nature Moncton


ASIAN MULTICOLORED LADY BEETLE. OCT. 20, 2017. BRIAN STONE 

ASIAN MULTICOLORED LADY BEETLE. OCT. 20, 2017. BRIAN STONE 

BEAVER. OCT. 20, 2017. BRIAN STONE

BEAVER. OCT. 20, 2017. BRIAN STONE

BEAVER. OCT. 20, 2017. BRIAN STONE

COMMON GRACKLE. OCT. 20, 2017. BRIAN STONE

GADWALLS. OCT. 20, 2017. BRIAN STONE

HOODED MERGANSER. OCT. 20, 2017. BRIAN STONE

ICHNEUMON WASP . OCT. 20, 2017. BRIAN STONE

LAKE DARNER DRAGONFLY. OCT. 20, 2017. BRIAN STONE

WOOD DUCK. OCT. 20, 2017. BRIAN STONE

Friday, 20 October 2017

Oct 20 2017

NATURE MONCTON INFORMATION LINE, October 20, 2017 (Friday)

To view the photos mentioned in this edition go to http://nminfoline.blogspot.ca

Please advise editor at nelson@nb.sympatico.ca if any errors are noted in wording or photo labeling.

For more information on Nature Moncton, check into the website at
www.naturemoncton.com

Edited by: Nelson Poirier nelson@nb.sympatico.ca
Transcript by: Louise Nichols nicholsl@eastlink.ca
Info Line # 506-384-6397 (384-NEWS)
To respond by e-mail, please address your message to the information line editor nelson@nb.sympatico.ca.

** Les amis de nature sud-est have a regular weekly birding outing on Thursdays which has turned out to be a major success.  They had a great rare visitor on Thursday when they found a GREATER WHITE-FRONTED GOOSE [Oie rieuse] with CANADA GEESE [Bernache du Canada] at the Shediac Big Lobster Park.  Carmella Melanson captured a very lucky photo of the Greater White-fronted Goose in flight with a Canada Goose.  Note the orange legs, slightly smaller size and – when looking closely – you can pick up the white band at the base of the bill that gives the bird its name.

**We usually notice the large BLANCK AND YELLOW ARGIOPE SPIDER in August and September, but Blake SHERRARD took a photo of one in early July that is attached.  The Sheerrards also had a successful nesting of EASTERN BLUEBIRDS [Merlebleu de l'Est] in their yard nest box.  I’m attaching photos of the way that they have their bird house erected.  Photo A shows a pipe driven into the ground approximately a few feet; then Photo B and C show a slightly less-in-diameter longer pole that slides into it; the nest box is attached to the top of the pole with straps as Photo D shows.  There is the advantage of being able to lift out the pole with the nest box attached to clean it and quickly replace it with no ladder needed.  This set-up seems very solid as it has been there for more than several years.

** Aldo Dorio is still seeing HUDSONIAN GODWITS [Barge hudsonienne] at Hay Island.  He saw 6 there on Thursday morning.  He again got a photo of a female NORTHERN PINTAIL [Canard pilet].

** Brian Stone cruised the area between Gorge Rd and Mapleton Rd on Thursday, along Gorge Brook.  There was an area of a large pond near Mapleton Rd, and Brian was surprised at the several BEAVER [Castor] dams along the course of the brook, going from the pond.  No Beaver were at them during the day, but he did see lots of evidence of their nocturnal work from the dams, lodges, and tree harvesting.  There were also bushes loaded with fruit WINTER BERRY HOLLY.  He came across an AUTUMN MEADOWHAWK DRAGONFLY [Sympétrum Tardif] and one of the large fall spiders in its web.

** As many are noticing, there are still lots of shorebirds with us.  On a drop by to the river near the Bouctouche lagoon on Tuesday, I noted a basic-plumaged BLACK-BELLIED PLOVER [Pluvier argenté] resting on a rock in the river with a GREATER YELLOWLEGS [Grand Chevalier] near it that shows just how large the Black-bellied Plover is, averaging 1 ½ inches less than the often seemingly large Greater Yellowlegs.

** This week’s Sky-at-a-Glance is included in this edition, courtesy of Curt Nason.

This Week’s Sky at a Glance, October 21 – October 28

With an early-setting Moon this weekend it might be a good time for some good old fashioned giraffe hunting. No guns allowed, just find a place where the sky is not tainted by light pollution, and bring binoculars for an added treat.

The large constellation Camelopardalis (try ka-mellow-par'-da-lis) is somewhat easier to pronounce than it is to locate in the sky. Look below Cassiopeia, and between Perseus and Ursa Minor (the Little Dipper, which has the North Star at the end of the handle). Any stars you can see in this area compose the not-so-stellar giraffe. The constellation was imagined and charted on a globe by Dutch astronomer Petrus Plancius in 1612 and later adopted by other prominent makers of star charts. The name derives from how the Greeks regarded giraffes as camel leopards, with their long neck and spots.

An interesting binocular object called Kemble’s Cascade is an observing highlight within Camelopardalis. This asterism, forming a line of about 20 stars, was noticed by Canadian amateur astronomer Father Lucien Kemble, who reported it to a columnist at Sky and Telescope magazine. One method of finding your way there is to imagine a line across the top stars of Cassiopeia’s W shape, right to left, and extend it an equal distance. Near one end of this asterism a telescope will reveal the open star cluster NGC 1502. Happy hunting.

This Week in the Solar System

Saturday’s sunrise in Moncton is at 7:44 am and sunset will occur at 6:22 pm, giving 10 hours, 38 minutes of daylight (7:48 am and 6:28 pm in Saint John). Next Saturday the Sun will rise at 7:54 am and set at 6:10 pm, giving 10 hours, 16 minutes of daylight (7:58 am and 6:17 pm in Saint John).

The Moon is at first quarter on Friday, October 27; a great target for telescopes later in the week. Saturn continues to awe observers with views of its rings in early evening. Jupiter is in conjunction with the Sun on Thursday, while Mercury sets about 20 minutes after them. Mars is nine degrees above Venus this weekend in the morning sky, and they increase that spread by a few degrees over the week. Look for meteors springing from Orion’s club early in the morning this weekend. This minor meteor shower is one of two arising from Halley’s Comet.

International Observe the Moon Night is on Saturday, October 28. Members and guests of RASC NB will have telescopes and binoculars set up at the Irving Nature Park in Saint John for this event on Friday, October 27 from 6:30 pm to 9 pm, with a back-up date of Saturday.

Questions? Contact Curt Nason at
nasonc@nbnet.nb.ca.
Nelson Poirier,
Nature Moncton
 
BEAVER CHEWED TREE. OCT. 19, 2017. BRIAN STONE

BEAVER DAM. OCT. 19, 2017. BRIAN STONE

BEAVER DAM. OCT. 19, 2017. BRIAN STONE

BEAVER LODGE. OCT. 19, 2017. BRIAN STONE

BLACK AND YELLOW ARGIOPE (Argiope aurantia) JULY, 2017.BLAKE SHERRARD 

BLACK AND YELLOW ARGIOPE (Argiope aurantia) JULY, 2017.BLAKE SHERRARD 

BLACK-BELLIED PLOVER AND GREATER YELLOWLEGS.OCT 17, 2017.NELSON POIRIER

BLACK-BELLIED PLOVER.OCT 17, 2017.NELSON POIRIER

BROWN LEAFHOPPER. OCT. 19, 2017._ BRIAN STONE

Camelopardalis

GREATER WHITE-FRONTED GOOSE AND CANADA GOOSE Oct 19 2017 CARMELLA MELANSON

HUDSONIAN GODWIT.OCT 19, 2017.ALDO DORIO

Kemble's Cascade

NORTHERN PINTAIL (FEMALE).OCT 19, 2017.ALDO DORIO

SLIDE TRAIL TO POND. OCT. 19, 2017. BRIAN STONE

SMALL POND. OCT. 19, 2017. BRIAN STONE

SPIDER IN WEB. OCT. 19, 2017. BRIAN STONE

SPIDER IN WEB. OCT. 19, 2017. BRIAN STONE

SPOTTED SPREADWING DAMSELFLY. OCT. 19, 2017. BRIAN STONE

SWALLOW NEST BOX a BASE POLE.OCT 17, 2017.NELSON POIRIER

SWALLOW NEST BOX b BASE POLE.OCT 17, 2017.NELSON POIRIER

SWALLOW NEST BOX c BASE POLE.OCT 17, 2017.NELSON POIRIER

SWALLOW NEST BOX d BASE POLE.OCT 17, 2017.NELSON POIRIER

WINTERBERRY HOLLY BERRIES. OCT. 19, 2017._ BRIAN STONE 

WINTERBERRY HOLLY BERRIES. OCT. 19, 2017._ BRIAN STONE