Thursday, 19 April 2018

April 19 2018

NATURE MONCTON INFORMATION LINE, April 19, 2018 (Thursday)

Please advise editor at nelson@nb.sympatico.ca if any errors are noted in wording or photo labeling.
For more information on Nature Moncton, check into the website at www.naturemoncton.com
Edited by: Nelson Poirier nelson@nb.sympatico.ca
Transcript by: Catherine Johnson johnson2@xplornet.com
Info Line # 506-384-6397 (384-NEWS)

To respond by e-mail, please address your message to the information line editor 
nelson@nb.sympatico.ca

**Gabriel Gallant shares a few observations he was able to accompany with photos the past few days.  He has had his first PINE SISKINS that he has had this past winter come to his feeder yard when 4 came by. Several others have commented on the same scenario.  There appears to be more pine siskins around bird feeding areas recently than during the winter when we most often see them.  
On Monday Gabriel took a walk down the Bell Marsh trail to encounter 6 HOUSE FINCH and a small group of AMERICAN TREE SPARROWS.  It's a great time to monitor activity at Bell Marsh.  
On Wednesday while driving on #2 highway, the Fredericton highway, he spotted a very white plumage SNOWY OWL in a tree near the highway. Most snowy owls at this point must be filing flight plans north. 

**Kathy Popma had a SUMMER TANAGER drop by her Sackville yard on Wednesday for a brief visit and got a photo.  It is a first summer male and an uncommon visitor to NB. As it matures it will take on a reddish plumage with dark but not black wings and tail that it will retain all year.  They bred to the south of us in the southern US across to the south-western US. 

**Roger Leblanc had  AMERICAN WOODCOCK start vocalizing around his Notre Dame home on Wednesday evening.  There were at least two. To add to the dusk activity, a BARRED OWL was calling as a backdrop.  
The snow load is still heavy in the wooded area around Roger's home and expected them to be later this year as they have been quite active in some locations already.  

**There has been a surprising number of INDIGO BUNTING reports out of NS.  It may be a bird to watch for in NB at the moment.  

**Aldo Dorio got a photo of a HOODED MERGANSER pair being escorted about the Hay Island coastline under the guidance of a male RED-BREASTED MERGANSER on Wednesday.  On Thursday morning he got a photo of a female breeding plumage COMMON GOLDENEYE that shows the anterior bill with its orange tip, where as its kin the female BARROWS GOLDENEYE would have a total orange bill in breeding plumage. 
 Nelson Poirier 
Nature Moncton 
COMMON GOLDENEYE (FEMALE). APRIL19, 2018.ALDO DORIO

HOODED MERGANSER PAIR AND RED-BREASTED MERGANSER (MALE) IN FRONT. APRIL18, 2018

HOUSE FINCH (MALE) APRIL 16, 2018. GABRIEL GALLANT

PINE SISKIN APRIL 14, 2018. GABRIEL GALLANT

SNOWY OWL. APRIL 18, 2018. GABRIEL GALLANT

SUMMER TANAGER. KATHY POPMA. APRIL 18, 2018

Wednesday, 18 April 2018

April 18 2018

 
 
 
NATURE MONCTON INFORMATION LINE, April 18, 2018 (Wednesday)
To view the photos mentioned in this edition go to http://nminfoline.blogspot.ca
Please advise editor at nelson@nb.sympatico.ca  if any errors are noted in wording or photo labeling.
For more information on Nature Moncton, check into the website at 
www.naturemoncton.com
Edited by: Nelson Poirier nelson@nb.sympatico.ca
Transcript by: Catherine Johnson johnson2@xplornet.com
Info Line # 506-384-6397 (384-NEWS)

To respond by e-mail, please address your message to the information line editor nelson@nb.sympatico.ca
.

**Catherine Hamilton shares a series of photos of spring wildlife coming alive around Petitcodiac.  Catherine comments it is amazing to see all the animals coming out and by the looks of the mammals and birds in her photos, the winter has treated them well. As well, the Petitcodiac Waterfowl Trail is coming alive with the season. 

**Richard Blacquiere was at Cape Spencer on Tuesday, which is a main headland east of Saint John, when he noted hundreds of LOONS passing by, the majority of them RED-THROATED LOONS and some COMMON LOONS.  He contacted Dave Christie to see if he could check Cape Enrage to see if this migration was passing there as well. Dave was not able to check in the severe weather system in that area but did ask Barb Curlew who lives near that area to check from her home when she could.  Neither Dave nor Barb were able to see much with the conditions but chances are a loon migration occurred at Cape Enrage after Richard's observation at Cape Spencer.
  
Dave also comments on his way home on Tuesday evening he slowed up for 3 WHITE-TAILED DEER crossing the road at the southern end of Hillsborough but as he waited for the 3 to cross they were promptly followed 2 more, then 1 more than 2 more to complete the entourage of 8 deer.  

**A very special thank you to Gart Bishop for coming to Nature Moncton meeting in not great driving conditions to deliver an excellent presentation on his knowledge of that unique place in NB, Grand Lake Meadows to a packed house. I suspect no one will ever drive through this area again not thinking of Gart's interpretation of the area.  We will be very fortunate on Saturday, July 28th to be guided by Gart to several of the areas he described and absorb the experience for ourselves.  Summer is a busy time but slot off this July 28th date on your calendars now if you can to see some of what Gart had everyone at attention with. 

**In the second half of the meeting all thanks to Adam Cheeseman from Nature NB, to come to explain some Nature NB activities on adapting to the climate change front that made for lots of thoughtful reflection. Adam also briefly described the Important Bird Areas program that will be very interesting to birders where these designated areas are in NB and why they are classed as IBA areas.  
Following Adam, member  Shirley Xue gave a slide presentation of many birds she had photographed on her recent trip to China to describe some very different birds in that part of the world yet see some of the similarities to our own birds that would appear very likely have distant or not so distant DNA connections. A very revealing look at bird life on another continent. 

 Nelson Poirier 
Nature Moncton 
CEDAR WAXWING. APRIL 15, 2018. CATHERINE HAMILTON

COYOTE. APRIL 12, 2018. CATHERINE HAMILTON 

GREEN-WINGED TEAL. APRIL 13, 2018. CATHERINE HAMILTON 

RED FOX. APRIL 4, 2018. CATHERINE HAMILTON 

SKUNK. APRIL 12, 2018. CATHERINE HAMILTON

TURKEY VULTURE. APRIL 12, 2018. CATHERINE HAMILTON 

TURKEY VULTURE. APRIL 12, 2018. CATHERINE HAMILTON 

WHITE-TAILED DEER. APRIL 12, 2018. CATHERINE HAMILTON 

WOOD DUCKS (MALE). APRIL 13, 2018. CATHERINE HAMILTON 

Tuesday, 17 April 2018

April 17 2018

 
 
NATURE MONCTON INFORMATION LINE, April 17, 2018 ( Tuesday )
 
To respond by e-mail, please address your message to the information line editor, nelson@nb.sympatico.ca . Please advise if any errors are noted in wording or photo labeling.

 For more information on Nature Moncton, check the website at
www.naturemoncton.com .

 
Edited by: Nelson Poirier nelson@nb.sympatico.ca
Transcript by: Brian Stone bjpstone@gmail.com
Info Line # 506-384-6397 (384-NEWS)

 
** It's last call tonight, Tuesday night, for the Nature Moncton meeting at 7:00 pm at the Rotary Pavillion Lodge across from the former Cabela's location. Note that the starting time is 7:00, not 8:00 as was incorrectly placed in the website announcement. The write up is attached. In the second half of the meeting Shirley Xu will give a short presentation on birds encountered on a visit to China and other members to share their items of interest.
 
Nature Moncton April Meeting
Grand Lake Meadows Natural Protected Area
Date: April 17, 2018 at 7:00 PM
Mapleton Park Rotary Lodge (across from former Cabela’s)
Speaker: Gart Bishop
 The unique wetlands along the Trans Canada Highway between Jemseg and Upper Gagetown are part of the Grand Lake Meadows. A portion of these wetlands is protected as Grand Lake Protected Natural Area. It is home to a collection of species which are not found elsewhere in the province. Gart Bishop will describe some of these species -- including New Brunswick’s smallest vascular plant -- that make this area so different from other wetlands.
 Gart has also agreed to lead a Nature Moncton Field trip this summer to this special area to see in real time many of the species mentioned in his presentation that can be found in this unusual community and that have led to protection of the area. These species will all be emerging and appearing over the next months.


 
** Jean Paul Leblanc was quick to followup yesterdays edition concerning a TREE SWALLOW [Hirondelle bicolore] they had one arrive to their Bouctouche yard on Monday morning. I suspect that this is the beginning of a major onslaught of this usually first of the Swallow clan to return. I hope that the sudden weather event is only a temporary inconvenience for the new arrivals.
** Gordon Rattray visited the Memramcook Arthur St. lagoon on Monday. The male CANVASBACK [Fuligule à dos blanc] that has been there was off and elsewhere as it frequently has been. There was a SCAUP and a pair of NORTHERN SHOVELER [Canard souchet] ducks on the lagoon. Gordon got a nice photo of the male RUDDY DUCK [Érismature rousse] that has been seen there. Gordon moved on to the Sackville Waterfowl Park to see a female AMERICAN KESTREL [Crécerelle d'Amérique] on power lines en route.
The prominent species in the Sackville Waterfowl Park were AMERICAN WIGEON [Canard d'Amérique] and GADWALL [Canard chipeau]. He got a nice photo of each gender of Wigeon, and a photo of a Gadwall pair that nicely shows the gender differences.
** Sterling Marsh was driving on the Immigrant Rd. just before Cape Tormentine on Monday when he came across two TURKEY VULTURES [Urubu à tête rouge] partaking of a ripened road kill Raccoon lunch. It almost appeared that one was on guard while the other dined.
** Mac Wilmot comments that it was a great day when you can look out your dining room window and photograph a spring dressed, male WOOD DUCK [Canard branchu] as happened to him in his Lower Coverdale yard on Monday. Mac also had a brief visit from a PINE WARBLER [Paruline des pins] to his suet feeder but it was quickly crowded out by HAIRY WOODPECKERS [Pic chevelu] before he could capture a photo.
** Lois Budd had a DARK-EYED JUNCO [Junco ardoisé] arrive to her Salisbury feeder yard on Monday that was sporting a very white tail. This is a partial albino bird. Note the millet sprays that Lois uses at her feeder which she comments are Sparrow magnets.
** There surely has not been an invasion of Bohemian Waxwings this season. It was therefore a surprise for Clarence Cormier to have a flock of approximately two hundred BOHEMIAN WAXWINGS [Jaseur boréal] arrive around his Grande Digue site on Monday. He has had small groups of Cedar Waxwings popping in all winter. He also had a hundred plus blackbirds that were a combination of adult male RED-WINGED BLACKBIRDS [Carouge à épaulettes], some first summer male Red-winged Blackbirds now, and COMMON GRACKLES [Quiscale bronzé] as well that included some females. Also two BROWN-HEADED COWBIRDS [Vacher à tête brune] were present on Monday and two FOX SPARROWS [Bruant fauve].
** Ethel Douglas visited the Sackville Waterfowl Park on April 11 to see AMERICAN WIGEONS [Canard d'Amérique], GADWALLS [Canard chipeau], MALLARDS [Canard colvert], CANADA GEESE [Bernaches du Canada] and several RING-BILLED GULLS [Goéland à bec cerclé]. Ethel comments that she had a male RING-NECKED PHEASANT [Faisan de Colchide] outside her Royal Oaks condo window on Saturday. The males have become very bold, if not careless, at this time of year.
** Jan Tingley reports activity that she saw on Sunday morning around the first pond at the bottom of the hill in Hillsborough. She saw a pair of RED-BREASTED MERGANSERS [Harle huppé] swimming around and a TREE SWALLOW [Hirondelle bicolore] on a hydro wire. This may have been the same bird that Jamie and Karen Burris photographed at that spot on Sunday. Red-breasted Mergansers are not normally expected in a fresh water pond, which I assume this pond is. Jan notes that the ice is still in the lower ponds. She also comments that there are a number of RING-NECKED PHEASANTS [Faisan de Colchide] chasing each other about in the fields behind East Riverview.
** In an earlier edition it was mentioned that few, if any, Scaup were noted on the Kennebecasis River along the Norton Shore Rd. on a visit there on April 09 but that Joanne Savage reported significant numbers there three weeks earlier so I had assumed that they had come and gone. However Joanne and David Putt did that same run on April 16 to find that there were approximately ten thousand SCAUP, so it would appear that the migration is far from over but is moving through in waves as many of our migrating seabirds do. Joanne comments that it was an impressive show with the sheer number of birds present.
** Recently Brian Stone submitted a photo of a mass of reddish, pea sized bodies on the bark of a tree at the Irving Arboretum in Bouctouche. I had no idea what they were, but curiosity killed the cat and so I had to go see it. It turned out to be an elderly American Basswood tree, aka American Linden. It turns out that the large branch had been severely split from the tree and when this happens with some trees, especially Basswood, it releases the growth of buds which are under the bark to emerge as a survival technique with the buds developing into new, young branches that were evident when looking further up the branch as more photos attached show.

The Basswood is very difficult to grow from seed but a cut stump will send up shoots called coppicing as other hardwood trees will do as well. The scenario described is another way the Basswood is able to self propagate and survive without seed propagation.
 Dan Hicks, an arborist with the City of Moncton, recognized what was going on from the series of photos and gave some reliable Google sites to interpret the scenario.
 
 
Nelson Poirier,
Nature Moncton
 



 
AMERICAN KESTREL (FEMALE). APRIL16, 2018. GORDON RATTRAY

AMERICAN WIGEON (FEMALE). APRIL16, 2018. GORDON RATTRAY

AMERICAN WIGEON (MALE). APRIL16, 2018. GORDON RATTRAY

BASSWOOD a. APRIL 15, 2018. NELSON POIRIER

BASSWOOD b. APRIL 15, 2018. NELSON POIRIER 

BASSWOOD c. APRIL 15, 2018. NELSON POIRIER 

BASSWOOD d. APRIL 15, 2018. NELSON POIRIER 

DARK-EYED JUNCO (WHITE TAIL).APRIL 16, 2018.LOIS BUDD

GADWELL (PAIR). APRIL16, 2018. GORDON RATTRAY

RUDDY DUCK (MALE). APRIL16, 2018. GORDON RATTRAY

TREE SWALLOW. APRIL 16, 2018. JP LEBLANC


TURKEY VULTURES. APRIL 16, 2018.STERLING MARSH 

WOOD DUCK (MALE). APRIL 16, 2018. MAC WILMOT

Monday, 16 April 2018

April 18 2018

 
 
 
NATURE MONCTON INFORMATION LINE, Apr. 16, 2018 (Monday)
 
To respond by e-mail, please address your message to the information line editor nelson@nb.sympatico.ca  Please advise if any errors are noted in wording or photo labeling.
 
For more information on Nature Moncton, check the website at www.naturemoncton.com
 
Edited by: Nelson Poirier nelson@nb.sympatico.ca
Transcript by: David Christie maryspt@mac.com
Info Line # 506-384-6397 (384-NEWS)
 
 
**   It’s Nature Moncton meeting night tomorrow, Tuesday. Details repeated at the end of this message.
 
**   It’s happened. A photo of a TREE SWALLOW [Hirondelle bicolore] had to be submitted this weekend, and Jamie Burris came through. Karen and Jamie spotted a cool-looking Tree Swallow in Hillsborough on Sunday. There were also some well-dressed AM. TREE SPARROWS [Bruant hudsonien] ready for breeding season. They will soon be leaving us for their northern, summer breeding grounds.
 
     A nice photo of some COMMON GOLDENEYES [Garrot à oeil d'or] taking flight. The goldeneye, being a diving duck has to make these running starts to take off. They were at Amos Point.
 
    Jamie has coined a new bird for his list: the goosganser. The photo tells “the rest of the story”.
 
**   Danny Sullivan had a very cooperative meeting with a BROWN CREEPER [Grimpereau brun] and a male PILEATED WOODPECKER [Grand Pic] at Irishtown Nature Park on Sunday. He got some excellent photos of their interaction.
 
**   Doreen Rossiter reports that she had her first visit of a NORTHERN FLICKER [Pic flamboyant] of the season. It was a female and quickly chose a suet block to re-fuel. Doreen comments that she is surprised no FOX SPARROWS [Bruant fauve] have appeared in her yard as yet, as other year’s records show them arriving significantly earlier. Doreen also says that she still has lots of AM. TREE SPARROWS [Bruant hudsonien] that don’t seem to be in any rush to leave.
 
**   Paula Lansdale, just outside of Alma, reports that she also has had NORTHERN FLICKERS [Pic flamboyant] arrive in fields around her home, on her lawn, as well as at the suet feeder. Paula also saw two different EASTERN PHOEBES [Moucherolle phébi], one at her home and another in the village. TURKEY VULTURES [Urubu à tête rouge] have also firmly returned. Paula saw seven in the air this past week.
 
**    Louise and Maurice Richard report that they had lots of spring activity around their Acadieville cabin this weekend, with a pair of DOWNY WOODPECKERS [Pic mineur] feeding heavily on a suet bar, RED-BREASTED NUTHATCHES [Sittelle à poitrine rousse], AMERICAN GOLDFINCHES [Chardonneret jaune], a male HOODED MERGANSER [Harle couronné], a BEAVER [Castor], CHICKADEES [Mésanges sp.] and SONG SPARROWS [Bruant chanteur]. It seems like a slow one, but spring is happening.
 
**    With ice breaking up off Hay Island, Aldo Dorio is getting nice observations of COMMON GOLDENEYE [Garrot à oeil d'or] and COMMON MERGANSER [Grand Harle] in pairs.
 
**    Janet Kempster and Brian Stone paid a visit to the Arthur Street lagoon in Memramcook and were rewarded with close observations of the male CANVASBACK [Fuligule à dos blanc] that has been cruising the Memramcook area. There also was a male RUDDY DUCK [Érismature rousse]  but it was much less cooperative to be photographed, as it stayed at the far side of the lagoon. MALLARDS [Canard colvert] were also present, the male being a hybrid. RING-NECKED DUCKS [Fuligule à collier] were also there.
 
      They stopped by Yolande LeBlanc’s, 251 Central Street in Memramcook, and saw the 2 CLAY-COLOURED SPARROWS [Bruant des plaines] continuing to be present. They were hiding behind a screen and did not cooperate for a photo.
 
     They made an unsuccessful hunt for the SANDHILL CRANE [Grue du Canada] in Scoudouc. At Pointe-du-Chêne they found RED-BREASTED MERGANSERS [Harle huppé], BLACK [Macreuse à bec jaune] and SURF SCOTERS [Macreuse à front blanc]. It appears that a significant number of LESSER BLACK-BACKED GULLS [Goéland brun] have dropped by that area again this year. They were off at a distance, but Brian got documentary photos that show the dark mantle, yellow legs, and size smaller than a HERRING GULL [Goéland argenté] to identify them. There were at least ten Lesser Black-backed Gulls and they suggest the possibility of many more, but distance prevented certainty.
 
**   A heads up for the Tuesday night, April 17, Nature Moncton meeting night at 7:00 pm at the Rotary Lodge across from  the former Cabela's location. The special guest will be Gart Bishop who will speak on the Grand Lake Meadows natural protected area. Gart will show what is present in this unique community to make it a protected area to be preserved in perpetuity. The write up is attached.
 
      In the second half of the evening Shirley Xu will give a presentation on some birds in China. Shirley and her husband moved to Moncton and became interested in birds after joining Nature Moncton and during a recent return trip to China they found themselves birding and photographing what they saw.
 
Nature Moncton April Meeting
 
Grand Lake Meadows Natural Protected Area
Date: April 17, 2018 at 7:00 PM
 
Mapleton Park Rotary Lodge (across from former site of Cabela’s)
 
Speaker: Gart Bishop
 
The unique wetlands along the Trans Canada Highway between Jemseg and Upper Gagetown are part of the Grand Lake Meadows. A portion of these wetlands is protected as Grand Lake Protected Natural Area. It is home to a collection of species which are not found elsewhere in the province. Gart Bishop will describe some of these species -- including New Brunswick’s smallest vascular plant -- that make this area so different from other wetlands.
 
 
Nelson Poirier,
Nature Moncton
 
 
AMERICAN TREE SPARROW APRIL 15 2018 JAMIE BURRIS

BLACK SCOTERS. APRIL 15, 2018. BRIAN STONE

BROWN CREEPER. APRIL 15, 2018. DANNY SULLIVAN 

BROWN CREEPER. APRIL 15, 2018. DANNY SULLIVAN 

CANVASBACK DUCK.  APRIL 15, 2018. BRIAN STONE

CANVASBACK DUCK.  APRIL 15, 2018. BRIAN STONE

CANVASBACK DUCK.  APRIL 15, 2018. BRIAN STONE

COMMON GOLDENEYE (PAIR).APRIL 15, 2018. ALDO DORIO

COMMON GOLDENEYE APRIL 12 2018 JAMIE BURRIS

COMMON MERGANSER (PAIR) AND COMMON GOLDENEYE (MALE).APRIL 15, 2018. ALDO DORIO

GOOSGANSER APRIL 15 2018 JAMIE BURRIS

GREAT BLUE HERON APRIL 15 2018 JAMIE BURRIS

HOODED MERGANSER APRIL 15 KAREN BURRIS

LESSER BLACK-BACKED GULL AND HERRING GULLS. APRIL 15, 2018.  BRIAN STONE

LESSER BLACK-BACKED GULLS AND HERRING GULLS. APRIL 15, 2018.  BRIAN STONE

PILEATED WOODPECKER. APRIL 15, 2018. DANNY SULLIVAN

RED-BREASTED MERGANSER ( FEMALE ). APRIL 15, 2018. BRIAN STONE

RED-BREASTED MERGANSER (MALE ). APRIL 15, 2018. BRIAN STONE

RED-BREASTED MERGANSER (MALE ). APRIL 15, 2018. BRIAN STONE

RING-NECKED DUCKS. APRIL 15, 2018. BRIAN STONE

RUDDY DUCK (MALE). APRIL 15, 2018._ BRIAN STONE

SONG SPARROW. APRIL 15, 2018. MAURICE RICHARD 

SURF SCOTER (MALE). APRIL 15, 2018. BRIAN STONE

TREE SWALLOW APRIL 15 2018 JAMIE BURRIS